Faculty of Chemistry

New publications and Deans

Recent Publications

by J. Han, C. Funk, J. Eyberg, S. Bailer and C. Richert

Chem. Biodiv. 2020, published online December 3

The Richert Group, in collaboration with the Bailer Group, publishes new C-nucleoside with antiviral activity.

For further information please contact:
Prof. Clemens Richert
Institute of Organic Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by Jian Sun, Josh Abbenseth, Hendrik Verplancke , Martin Diefenbach, Bas de Bruin, David Hunger, Christian Würtele, Joris van Slageren, Max C. Holthausen and Sven Schneider

Nature Chemistry, Vol. 12, 2020, 1054–1059

For further information please contact:
Prof. Joris van Slageren
Institute of Physical Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by Matthias Wieland, Carsten Dingler, Rotraut Merkle, Joachim Maier and Sabine Ludwigs 

ACS Applied Materials Interfaces, 2020, 12, 6742.

For further information please contact:
Prof. Sabine Ludwigs
Institute of Polymer Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by David Neusser, Claudia Malacrida, Michal Kern, Yannic Gross, Joris van Slageren and Sabine Ludwigs

Chemistry of Materials 2020, 32, 6003.

For further information please contact:
Prof. Sabine Ludwigs
Institute of Polymer Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by Alok Mahata, Shubhadeep Chandra, Avijit Maiti, D. Krishna Rao, Cem B. Yildiz, Biprajit Sarkar and Anukul Jana

Org. Lett. 2020, 22, 8332−8336

For further information please contact:
Prof. Biprajit Sarkar
Institute of Inorganic Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by Avijit Maiti, Shubhadeep Chandra, Biprajit Sarkar and Anukul Jana

Chem. Sci. 2020
DOI: 10.1039/d0sc03622f

For further information please contact:
Prof. Biprajit Sarkar
Institute of Inorganic Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by Peiwen Wang, Janina Trück, Stefan Niesen, Julian Kappler, Kathrin Küster, Ulrich Starke, Felix Ziegler, Andreas Hintennach and Michael R. Buchmeiser

Batteries & Supercaps 2020, 3, 1239–1247
DOI: 10.1002/batt.202000097

For further information please contact:
Prof. Michael R. Buchmeiser
Institute of Polymer Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by Vassiliki Damakoudi, Tobias Feldner, Edina Dilji, Andrey Belkin and
Clemens Richert

ChemBioChem
DOI: 10.1002/cbic.202000678

For further information please contact:
Prof. Clemens Richert
Institute of Organic Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

 

by Janis V. Musso, Mathis J. Benedikter, Dongren Wang, Wolfgang Frey, Hagen J. Altmann, and Michael R. Buchmeiser

Chem. Eur. J. 2020, 26, 8709 – 8713
DOI: 10.1002/chem.202000840

For further information please contact:
Prof. Michael R. Buchmeiser
Institute of Polymer Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by Roman Schowner, Iris Elser, Mathis Benedikter, Mohasin Momin, Wolfgang Frey, Tanja Schneck, Laura Stöhr, and Michael R. Buchmeiser

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2020, 59, 951 – 958
International Edition: DOI: 10.1002/anie.201913322
German Edition: DOI: 10.1002/ange.201913322

For further information please contact:
Prof. Michael R. Buchmeiser
Institute of Polymer Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

by Clemens Richert, Dejana Jovanovic, Peter Tremmel, S., Pradeep Pallan and Martin Egli

Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
DOI: 10.1002/anie.202008665

For further information please contact:
Prof. Clemens Richert
Institute of Organic Chemistry
University of Stuttgart

 

In the course of the evolution of higher organisms such as mammals, gene duplication often occurs. The resulting "twin genes" have a very similar genetic makeup, but are independent of each other and can therefore specialize in certain tasks. An example of this is DNA methylation, a chemical change in the basic building blocks of the genetic material of a cell, which is caused by the transfer of methyl groups by enzymes (DNA methyl transferases, DNMT) to certain locations in the DNA. The DNA-methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B are two forms of these enzymes in human cells that have arisen from gene duplication.

Over 20 years ago, it was discovered that DNMT3B is essential for the DNA methylation of certain regions in the human genome and that insufficient activity of DNMT3B leads to the so-called ICF syndrome. However, why DNMT3B is specifically required for this task and why, for example, the twin DNMT3A cannot take over this task has so far remained unknown.

DNMT3B is required for the methylation of certain sequences in human chromosomes (orange). The specificity of DNMT3B for these regions is determined by a specific protein loop around Arginine 823 (gray). Figure: University of Stuttgart / IBTB.

In cooperation with groups from the University of California and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the team of Prof. Jeltsch has now been able to solve the structure of DNMT3B in complex with other DNA sequences and measure the turnover rate of DNA methylation by DNMT3B and DNMT3A on thousands of DNA sequences. It was shown that DNMT3B is particularly active on its target sequences in the human genome due to a special protein loop, while DNMT3A can only work poorly on these sequences.

Authors: Linfeng Gao, Max Emperle, Yiran Guo, Sara A. Grimm, Wendan Ren, Sabrina Adam, Hidetaka Uryu, Zhi-Min Zhang, Dongliang Chen, Jiekai Yin, Michael Dukatz, Hiwot Anteneh, Renata Z. Jurkowska, Jiuwei Lu, Yinsheng Wang, Pavel Bashtrykov, Paul A. Wade, Gang Greg Wang, Albert Jeltsch & Jikui Song
Nature Communications volume 11, Article number: 3355 (2020)

For further information please contact
Prof. Albert Jeltsch
Institute of Biochemistry and Technical Biochemistry, Dept. of Biochemistry
University of Stuttgart

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